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Blog entries tagged with The Flying Dutchman

The Flying Dutchman: Technical Preparation

Numerous puzzle pieces of scenery for our new production of The Flying Dutchman are assembled to create one cohesive and spectacular vision. 

Flying Dutchman Technical Preparation

This is an early view from the auditorium looking through to the backstage. This bridge weighs nearly 5000 pounds and is an integral and dynamic element of the scenery. The bridge “flies” in and out on cue, controlled by a computerized chain motor console.

Flying Dutchman Technical Preparation

The deck is composed of hundreds of individual pieces of structural steel. When fully assembled with its mirrored surface, the deck becomes the playing area for dozens of cast members.  

Flying Dutchman Scenery Stage Lighting

The  scenery as designed is comprised of layers of vivid imagery  that only become apparent when completed with show lighting and effects. In this image, final preparations are made for the first onstage rehearsal.


jay Hunter Morris Returns to The Flying Dutchman for Final Two Performances

jay Hunter Morris

Jay Hunter Morris, one of today's tenors in the Wagnerian repertory, will return to LA Opera to perform the role of Erik in the final two performances of The Flying Dutchman on March 27 and 30. Mr. Morris had originally been scheduled to appear as Erik, but was forced to cancel his appearance when a severe case of gastroenteritis made it impossible for him to begin rehearsals in February. Corey Bix subsequently replaced Mr. Morris as Erik for the first two performances of The Flying Dutchman, but has had to withdraw from the production himself due to illness; the role was performed on March 21 and 24 by tenor John Pickle, who will remain in Los Angeles to cover the role. 

Jay Hunter Morris has previously appeared with LA Opera in 2006 as Unferth in the world premiere of Elliot Goldenthal's Grendel and in 2008 as Marky in the U.S. premiere of Howard Shore's The Fly. After 2011 appearances in the title role of Siegfried with San Francisco Opera, he has since performed that role in both Siegfried and Götterdämmerung at the Metropolitan Opera. He will perform Siegfried again with the Met later this spring and he will appear in the 2016 Ring cycle at Houston Grand Opera.

He will reprise the role of Erik in The Flying Dutchman this summer at Glimmerglass Opera. He has previously performed Erik at Seattle Opera, Opera Australia, Arizona Opera and Atlanta Opera.  Other recent appearances include Captain Ahab in Jake Heggie's Moby Dick at San Francisco Opera, San Diego Opera and at the Adelaide Festival, and Tristan in Tristan und Isolde for Welsh National Opera and at the Edinburgh Festival. For more information about Mr. Morris, please visit www.JayHunterMorris.com.

The final two performances of Richard Wagner's The Flying Dutchman will take place on Wednesday, March 27, and on Saturday, March 30. Both performances will take place at 7:30pm. Tickets start at $19 and can be purchased in person at the LA Opera Box Office at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, by phone at 213.972.8001 or online at www.laopera.org.



10 Questions with... Ronnita Nicole Miller

Mezzo-Soprano Ronnita Nicole Miller is no stranger to LA Opera. An alumna of the Domingo-Thornton Young Artist Program, and with LA Opera appearances including Marcellina in The Marriage of Figaro, Florence Pike in Albert Herring and Flosshilde/Schwertleite in the Ring cycle, she has become a seasoned (and supremely gifted) member of the LA Opera family. Ronnita has the distinction of being in both Cinderella (La Cenerentola) as Tisbe and The Flying Dutchman as Mary at the same time! Not an easy task, but Ronnita makes it look effortless.  

Ronnita Nicole Miller

We aksed Ronnita 10 questions about opera, life, and what's next on her busy agenda.  And in the process learned a lot about this talented singer. 

Who do you love more these days, Wagner or Rossini?

Well, I'm not sure. Mary is definitely a little more challenging; her character is a little more of a challenge vocally and dramatically. Rossini, and the other bel canto composers keep me honest. I have to say that so far, I'm digging Rossini, even though the part of Tisbe really scared me at first.

If you could keep one of the costumes from either production, which would you choose?

Honestly? Neither.  

Have you dreamt that Clorinda would appear in Dutchman?  Or that Mary would be Cinderella’s more morose sister?

I've never dreamt that either of these things would happen. But wouldn't it be hilarious if you saw one of the stepsister’s wigs ascending from the trap instead of Mary, coming in to wreak havoc?

What’s currently on your iPod?

There is A LOT of music on my iPod. Most of it is pop, jazz, and alternative music. I do have opera. But when I'm not working, I listen to a lot of pop music. Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, Ella Fitzgerald, and Bob Marley are all favorites and had big influences. They didn't save anything when they stepped onstage. It still inspires me. Any artist that can be so amazingly talented, practice so thoroughly, and yet, achieve such total freedom onstage is magnificent. I'm also a big fan of Bruno Mars and Adele. They're on heavy repeat right now.

Have you and Stacy Tappan recorded ‘Sisters’ from White Christmas? 

We have not…yet.

Cinderella (La Cenerentola)

Do you have a favorite moment in Cinderella?

Yes, the moment when Tisbe decides to not follow her older sister.  One can always choose to be a better person.

When you’re not onstage, what’s your favorite way to occupy your time?

During a show when I'm not onstage, I'm probably dancing in the hallway, talking to people, or playing with my iPad. If it's in rehearsal, I may even crochet.  When I'm not at rehearsal or onstage, I'm probably learning music, reading, or playing Tomb Raider on my PC or Just Dance on Wii.  I like video games a lot.

How/when did you decide to become an opera singer?

Well, being an extremely introverted and slightly shy person (no one ever believes that), I actually had a lot of trouble getting up and singing, much less speaking in front of people.  I joined chorus because there was this cute guy that I wanted to get to know.  I got in, but I never wanted to sing solos.  For some reason I decided to major in music with an extremely heavy science course load.  I actually cried the first time my opera director in undergrad asked me to sing.  I would cry at solo and ensemble competitions in high school when I would have to sing (I also played viola, with no problems).  I guess I was always afraid of my voice, afraid of people looking, watching me do something that was so vulnerable.  I think opera came as the result of two things, me being really shy but wanting to be able to express all the emotions I felt in some way and also because I was never really any good at singing gospel or jazz.  The ability to sing – that came later, through classical training, funny enough.

What’s your dream role?

In a perfect world, I would LOVE to sing Carmen and Amneris.  They have always been my two favorite ladies. Carmen, because she is so strong and beats men at their own game. She takes life as it comes and there is an incredible vulnerability in addition to her strength, which I think is why she's so incredibly irresistible. 

Amneris because, although she's typically classified as a villain (she is kind of a spoiled brat, she's never had to doubt anything could be hers as a princess), she is motivated by love.  Not in its greatest form, but it's the one thing she wants, that unfortunately, she can't have.  This, I can personally identify with. Everything she does is motivated by this fact.

Following your current run at LA Opera, what’s next for you?

 After my run with LA Opera, I go to cover Erda and the First Norn in Siegfried and Gotterdammerung at the Met, a concert at the Cincinnati May Festival, and then I prepare to move to Germany [to join the Deutsche Oper Berlin]!


LA Opera On Air Begins Saturday, May 18

For the eighth consecutive year Classical KUSC brings you LA Opera On Air, Saturdays at 10am.  Each week you’ll hear a complete performance from LA Opera’s 2012/13 Season, recorded live at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.  The series is hosted by KUSC’s Duff Murphy and continues to be made possible by a generous grant from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, spearheaded by the efforts of Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky.

May 18
Giuseppe Verdi: The Two Foscari

The Two Foscari

Plácido Domingo and James Conlon join forces in a new production of this Verdi masterpiece. The languid canals and boisterous festivals of 15th-century Venice conceal a deadly web of secret plots and vindictive rivalries. Caught up in forces beyond their control, a father and son struggle to reclaim honor in a city that knows no mercy.

Plácido Domingo stars as a head of state, desperate to protect his son -- and himself -- from the ruthless enemies that surround them.

May 25
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Don Giovanni

The legendary seducer Don Juan returns in a production new to LA! Considered by many to be the greatest opera ever written, Don Giovanni deftly balances comedy and tragedy with unforgettable music.

Features a vividly theatrical staging by the legendary director Peter Stein, the smolderingly intense Ildebrando D'Arcangelo as Don Giovanni, and LA Opera's rich tradition of Mozart's classics.

June 1
Giacomo Puccini: Madame Butterfly

A love that knows no boundaries goes horribly wrong in a fateful meeting of East and West. What begins as an idyllic liaison in an enchanting land of cherry blossoms turns into the heartbreaking tragedy of an abandoned bride forced to make an excruciating decision.

A stunning production, never before seen in Los Angeles, melds sumptuous costumes with evocative period scenery. From the acclaimed director of Il Postino, Ron Daniels.

June 8
Richard Wagner: Flying Dutchman

The legend of the ghostly ship condemned to wander the oceans forever has fascinated opera lovers - and more recently, movie lovers - for hundreds of years. An enthralling score, illuminated by striking stage imagery, powers a thrilling journey into an unsettling, mythic world where a tormented spirit seeks true love as his redemption.

James Conlon, one of the foremost Wagner interpreters of our time, leads a world-class cast in a mesmerizing production, new to Los Angeles, staged by the brilliant Nikolaus Lehnhoff.

June 15
Giochino Rossini: La Cenerentola (Cinderella)

In her impoverished stepfather's castle, a kindhearted girl dreams of escaping the tyranny of her vain stepsisters. When the prince announces that he will choose his bride at a glamorous ball, she seizes the opportunity to take control of her own destiny.

Rossini's warmhearted retelling of the Cinderella story is a delightfully romantic comedy, brought to life by the dazzling vocal fireworks of an exciting young cast and a production new to Los Angeles! Conducted by James Conlon.

June 22
Giacomo Puccini: Tosca

A fiery prima donna is forced to play a role she never imagined when she becomes trapped between her allegiance to her rebel lover and the scheming of a treacherous police chief who will stop at nothing in his lust for her. The explosive triangle comes to a hair-raising conclusion in one of opera's bloodiest, most intense dramas.

One of the most popular of all operas, Tosca is a passionate tale set to some of Puccini's most openly beautiful and passionate music.

For more information visit www.KSUC.org